Mortar boards, pins, heels, wine, prizes and speeches: it’s Graduation 2014!

It’s that time of year again when campus is buzzing with excited (and slightly nervous) students, proud parents, and lecturers dressed as you’ve never seen them before! Graduation is a time to celebrate all our History of Art students have achieved during their time at Birmingham, not just on their degree programme but also as members of our department, the Barber Institute, UoB and the city itself. As a department we are pleased to be able to give out two prizes each year – the Sam Beighton Prize for the best dissertation, and the Emily Rastall Prize for the best overall contribution to the department. Competition is always stiff and there are more worthy candidates than there are prizes: every year, many of our students give generously of their time and energy in volunteering for various events, helping to run open days, applicant visit days, and workshops, and offering peer support. The department really appreciates this because it helps to make the department what it is – friendly, fun, and a great place to study.

Here we’ve put together a selection of photos from the ceremony on July 11th when Single and some Joint Honours History of Art Students graduated. You can read about about our prize winners and also see David, one of the department’s founding members, being given the by-now traditional ‘lift off’!

Dr Richard Clay with Tayler, Alice and Olivia at our pre-gown reception

Dr Richard Clay with Tayler, Alice and Olivia at our pre-gown reception

 

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Senior lecturer David Hemsoll and Dr Fran Berry at speech time

 

Students and parents at speech time

Students and parents at speech time

 

This year, the Emily Rastall prize, awarded in memory of a student who sadly passed away just after her finals in 2012, was shared by French and History of Art student Holly Wain and History of Art student Caroline Hetherington for their overall contribution to the department.

On receiving the prize, Caroline said: ‘Receiving the Emily Rastall prize was a little surprising (and embarrassing!), but I was very pleased to get it. Being recognised for contributing to the department made me think back over the three years of my course and remember the exciting things I was able to accomplish. It definitely reminded me that there was a lot more to my degree than the final mark.’

How did she feel at graduation? ‘Graduation was a lovely opportunity for all of us to be excited and proud after all the nerves of results day, although for me the best part of the day was my parents turning up about two minutes before we went on stage to receive our degrees.’

Is there anything she’ll miss now she’s graduated? ‘I will miss actually studying art history the most, as especially in final year I have loved the amount of research and interesting conversations that have taught me so much more about the subject. Alongside this, writing a dissertation about a previously unstudied sculpture probably gave me the most satisfaction.’ But, Caroline’s not going very far: ‘I am not leaving the University yet – I’m now a graduate trainee in Professional Services, working on different placements over the next year. I don’t know where I’ll go after that, but I’m pretty sure I’m not done studying yet.’

 

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Holly (left) and Caroline standing by the tree planted in Emily’s memory in the Barber grounds

 

Holly said, ‘I feel very honoured to be receiving the Emily Rastall Prize as it means the department can continue to celebrate the commitment and enthusiasm Emily had for Art History at the Barber. It also gave me the chance to reflect on my past four years in the History of Art department and how much I enjoyed contributing to projects like the Golovine Blog.’

How was graduation for her? ‘My graduation day was fantastic because I could share all the relief and happiness with my family and friends. My favourite moment was walking out of the Great Hall after the ceremony and feeling proud and excited for the future!’

What is her favourite memory of her degree? ‘My best memory of studying art history at the Barber is working with my tutor Liz for my dissertation. I loved researching using primary sources in archives because I felt like I could genuinely contribute something new and different. I enjoyed it so much that I am coming back to the Barber in September to do a research masters in History of Art.’

 

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Cheers! Drs Fran Berry and Camilla Smith on the Barber steps with Caroline, Tayler, olivia, Alice and Nelle

 

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It all happened here! Holly, Hang, Emma and Caroline with Dr Liz L’Estrange on the Barber steps

 

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Relieved that no-one fell up or down the stairs! Claire, Louisa, Connie and Grace after the ceremony

 

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Milling around outside the Barber

 

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Hats off!

 

And now for the most traditional event of the day…

 

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Ready…

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…steady…

 

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…wave, David!

 

And now for something more sensible (well, depends what you make of the lecturers’ outfits):

Outside the Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Outside the Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Sam Beighton Prize for the best dissertation was this year awarded to Joint Honours History of Art and English student, Sarah Cowie. Here she tells us a bit how she felt receiving the prize about the  dissertation that she wrote.

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Prize-winner Sarah on graduation day

 

How did she feel getting the prize? ‘I am very pleased to have been awarded the Sam Beighton Prize this year, as I know there was much competition! It is a nice recognition of my efforts with the dissertation, and I am extremely grateful to my supervisor for guiding me in the right direction.’

How was graduation? ‘My graduation day was lovely, although as a Joint Honours student I graduated on a different day to some of my  History of Art peers, but Josh and I did still manage to have a photo shoot in front of the Barber though!’

What was her best memory of studying at Birmingham? ‘Aside from the second-year study trip to Rome, I think my best memories are of the Barber. It is such an inspiring environment, with amazing research materials in the library and galleries, and always a great venue for lunch with concert music playing in the background!’

Any plans for the future? ‘My plans for the future are yet to be made – I wasn’t very good at thinking ahead in final year! At the moment I’m considering doing a law conversion in Bristol, after travelling this year.’

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Sarah with fellow JH History of Art and English student Josh

 

What was it like researching and writing a dissertation? ‘In the same way as with any research, my dissertation topic adapted, evolved (and unfortunately considering the word count, expanded!) the more I read around the field of study. What began as an interest in Kurt Schwitters’ association with the German Dadaists gradually became a study of exile and anti-nationalism during the Nazi regime; a subject area that complimented my final year special subject, German Modernisms of the Body.

The dissertation explores national identity and the concept of Heimat in Kurt Schwitters’ (1887-1948) assemblage, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, which was produced in Hanover in 1920 and then reworked by the exiled artist nineteen years later in Oslo. The dramatically different cultural climates of these two completion dates – which bridge together post-World War One Germany and pre-World War Two Europe – have invited interpretations of the work that place special emphasis on Schwitters’ increasingly diminished sense of German national identity under the Nazi Regime. However, considering the irreparable damage left following Germany’s defeat in 1918 and the anti-nationalist sentiments outlined in the artist’s essay ‘Nationalitätsgefühl’ (National Sentiment) from 1924, the current study questions the extent to which Schwitters had a fixed sense of national identity, or any kind of investment in the Volksgemeinschaft even during these earlier years.

 

Kurt Schwitters, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, 1920/1939. Oil, paper, cardboard, wood, fabric, and ceramic on board (97 x 69 x 11 cm) London, Tate Collection.

Kurt Schwitters, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, 1920/1939. Oil, paper, cardboard, wood, fabric, and ceramic on board (97 x 69 x 11 cm) London, Tate Collection.

 

In challenging the reading of Spatial Growths as evidence of German or Norwegian national identity, the central tenet of the dissertation explores how Schwitters’ sustained use of found materials (themselves fragments of a disordered reality) is symbolic of a wider process of ordering exile. Indeed, the concept of Merz – a label which encompasses Schwitters’ innovative creative practices and a name which he adopted for himself in the 1920s – sheds light on the artist’s understanding of a transnational Heimat; signalling Schwitters’ desire for a more flexible identity in the midst of political discourses on national purity. Approached thus, the fusion of two nationalities in Spatial Growths cannot be considered a visual enactment of the artist’s loss of German national identity. Rather, through its palimpsest qualities and the incorporation of domestic materials, it alludes to Schwitters’ prolonged search for a stable Heimat in an unstable existence; contributing to a narrative of homelessness that defined the life of this artist.  

Detail of Schwitters' Spatial Growth

Detail of Schwitters’ Spatial Growth

 

Despite moments of panic when I thought I might not be able to actually view the work (it was touring Germany for much of the year), writing the dissertation came to be as rewarding as it was challenging. The opportunity to study one work of art in such depth, whilst drawing on the expertise of my supervisor, Dr Camilla Smith, enabled me to form a research topic that interested me greatly, and that I felt had not been fully explored before.’

 

Well done again to all our graduates this year – you have done us proud! You can see interviews with some of our students on graduation day here.

 

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Lyon’s Fête des Lumières: Commercialist extravaganza or installation art at its finest, asks French and Art History student Marianne Thomas

The city of Lyon, located in the heart of the French hexagon, is a beautiful and vibrant one, bursting with a wide spectrum of cultural events that is ever-surprising in its variety and seemingly never-ending in its frequency. It’s arguably little wonder then, that after choosing Lyon to be the location of my compulsory Year Abroad last year, I was just as excited to experience the weekly art markets and the annual film festival as I was to explore the city itself. However, there was always one highly-acclaimed event that stood out in the calendar more than most and that I looked forward to from September onwards: Lyon’s annual Fête des Lumières, coming to town on 6th December.

 

The city of Lyon

The city of Lyon

 

A gigantic festival of lights, it’s not difficult to see why just the idea of the Fête des Lumières held such appeal for the History of Art student in me. Each year on the first weekend of December, every corner of Lyon is illuminated: building-sized video installations, pyrotechnics and dazzling light displays stretch from the concrete housing-block communities of the inner suburbs to the sprawling, fountain-laden squares of the city centre, and transform after-dark Lyon into a living, breathing canvas. Thousands of artists apply each year with the hope of securing a small area of the city to show off their expertise in their chosen field; the festival undoubtedly gives many installation artists an unparalleled opportunity to exhibit their work in an imaginative way outside of the gallery.

Subsequently, after seeing numerous photos of the spectacles offered by previous years, I was understandably excited to see what 2013 would bring, and assumed that the citizens of Lyon – being lucky enough to have this event on their doorstep – would feel the same.

 

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An installation in one of the city’s squares, December 2013

 

Nevertheless, in the lead-up to December, I found that, upon talking to local residents, most of them didn’t seem to share in my excitement. Some groaned with dread at the thought of the imminent collapse of public transport in the wake of all the tourists, but many more bemoaned the fact that the festival had become so commercial in recent years and that the “true spirit” of it had been masked by gimmicks and consumerism. After learning more about the history and facts of the Fête, it became clear that both of these viewpoints were fairly understandable.

After all, amazingly, Lyon’s Fête des Lumières is the third most-visited annual festive event in the world, with only Rio Carnival and Oktoberfest beating it in the leaderboard. That’s to say that, on average, four million tourists flock to Lyon every year for an event that is barely advertised outside of the city itself, and is practically unknown in the UK. Suddenly, the transport-related anxiety made a lot of sense. The argument of the Fête being overrun by commercialism also seems to follow on pretty naturally; the origins of the festival are far from concrete, but the generally-accepted version of the narrative is that the Fête is a tribute to the Virgin Mary for saving the city from the plague during the 1600s, and that lighting up building façades and placing candles in windows is the Lyonnais way of giving thanks for the miracle. However, it’s easy to see that this prominent spiritual aspect of the festival could be easily forgotten amongst the bright lights and fireworks.

So when the Fête des Lumières finally rolled around in December, I was no longer sure what to expect. Was it going to prove to be the commercialist extravaganza that I’d been warned about, or the enormous, explosive art installation that I’d hoped for?

 

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The town hall ‘on fire’

 

I was pleased to find that it was predominantly the latter. Although perhaps many art critics would not consider a festival of lights to be an example of installation art in its traditional sense, there is no reason to dismiss it from the category altogether. The way in which the existing architecture of the city was moulded to fit each artist’s requirement was extraordinary: with the use of incredibly-intricate lighting projections, the town hall and fine art museum were seen to be “demolished”, before being rebuilt into a rainforest and then an underwater kingdom, amongst many other creative destinations.

 

The Fine Art Museum being transformed into a rose garden

The Fine Art Museum being transformed into a rose garden

 

An existing mural painted onto the side of a local boulangerie was “animated”, its characters brought to life, while the banks of the Rhone river were transformed into a light-up orchestra. Of course, the streets were fit to burst with bodies cramming to see the spectacles, and the sheer number of stalls enthusiastically selling mulled wine was much higher than I would have expected, but a touch of consumerism didn’t mean that the event could not still be regarded as a prime example of the flexibility of installation art.

In fact, witnessing the festival made me think back to a question that all History of Art students will be very familiar with from the first few nervous weeks of first year: What is Art? It doesn’t always have to be a Pre-Raphaelite painting from the National Gallery, or even the most recent and most ‘out-there’ Damien Hirst creation. At its basis, art is arguably about producing a reaction, and there’s no question that the Fête des Lumières continues to do that year after year, showcasing the best talent of this specific artistic niche in an unorthodox, citywide exhibition that celebrates and the Lyonnais landscape and adds a touch of magic to it too.

So if you ever want to experience an installation exhibition with a difference, Lyon in December may just be the place to go. It may not be “high art”, but it certainly shows how adaptable and all-encompassing art can be, and you’ll never be short of a glass of vin chaud as you watch architecture metamorphose before your eyes.

Marianne is studying a History of Art and French. To find out more about this degree programme see here. Read Marianne’s other report on living and working in Lyon here.

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“Spectacular discoveries”: The Ghent Altarpiece makes the news (… again!)

Ghent Altarpiece, St. Bavo's Ghent

Ghent Altarpiece, St. Bavo’s Ghent

Readers might remember that the famous Ghent Altarpiece by Hubert and Jan van Eyck was recently in the news. It last hit the headlines in April because of the ongoing puzzle over the whereabouts of the Just Judges panel, which was nicked from St. Bavo’s in Ghent in 1934 and has threatened to show up a several times in recent years; to no avail, unfortunately. You can read about all of that, plus a bit about the altarpiece’s tumultuous history more generally, on my previous post here.

For now at least, the Just Judges puzzle remains still a puzzle, and the altarpiece’s most recent foray into the public eye is in fact nothing to do with the Judges saga. The altarpiece is instead in the news this time for much more positive, if not exciting, reasons.

Restorers at work (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Restorers at work (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Since 2012, the Ghent Altarpiece has been in restoration. The work is being done at the Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Ghent, where visitors can apparently watch conservators at work on panels from the altarpiece through a glazed wall looking into a specially designed room where the restorers are at work (or so Christina Currie told me recently, who is from from the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage at Brussels (KIK-IRPA), the organisation responsible for overseeing the treatment). The total restoration of the polyptych has been split into 3 phases:

- Phase 1, underway now and due for completion this October, focuses on the outside shutters

- Phase 2, due to start on completion of phase 1, deals with the upper interior panels (the row commencing with Adam and finishing with Eve)

And…

- Phase 3, scheduled to start in April 2016 and complete the following October, deals with the bottom interior panels, so the Mystic Lamb, the Knights, Hermits and Pilgrims (and presumably they WON’T be doing anything with the Just Judges, which is a replica painted by Jef Van der Veken in 1945 to fill the gap left by the theft of the original)

Phase 1: outside shutters

Phase 1: outside shutters

Phase 2: Upper interior panels

Phase 2: upper interior panels

Phase 3: lower interior panels

Phase 3: lower interior panels

The cost of all this is pretty eye-watering: €1,260,433.20 (I wonder what the .20 is for?). So what do you get for that sort of money? Well, they’re examining and repairing the panels themselves, to allow for unconstrained contraction and expansion of the wood, thus preventing further cracking (i.e. panels have presumably been cradled at some point, which has lessened the “give” of the wood and caused fractures). They’re also removing those familiar yellowed and cracked varnish layers, which should make the whole thing look just that bit more brilliant. And finally, since they’re removing the varnishes anyway, they’re also examining the paint layers themselves, to establish if there are overpaints and restorations that ought to be removed, and whether any new restorations are required to damaged parts. All the while, the observations the restorers make will doubtless enrich our understanding of the van Eycks’ methods, and most probably shed light on the whole “what’s by Hubert and what’s by Jan?” problem.

And things are already getting very interesting indeed. During Phase 1, conservators have realised that much of the outside shutters actually feature extensive overpaints. And following 3D Hirox microscope and MA-XRF analyses (whatever they are), it was realised that the paint layers beneath the overpaints are, surprisingly, in good condition (I say surprisingly because overpaints usually hide nasty stuff). Consequently the decision was made to REMOVE pretty much an entire layer of paint from the surface of the outside shutters in a bid to reveal the van Eycks’ original paintwork. A CODART release (CODART is an international network for curators of Netherlandish art) tells us that this work is ongoing, and that centimeter by centimeter a steady hand(!!), wielding a scalpel (agh! – rather you than me), is removing the overpaint that obscures the van Eycks’ superior work.

And the results are impressive. The 2 images below from the Joos Vijd panel show sections where the overpaints have been removed, thus revealing the subtler, more nuanced brushwork that has hitherto been obscured:

Comparison of Vijd's hands: the hand on the far right has had overpaints removed, revealing subtler modelling (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Comparison of Vijd’s hands: the hand on the far right has had overpaints removed, revealing subtler modelling (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Patches of overpaint removed from Vijd's robe (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Patches of overpaint removed from Vijd’s robe (image credit: kikirpa.be)

Other discoveries include a cobweb in the corner of the panel showing Elisabeth Borluut, the wife of Vijd, the altarpiece’s patron; a finding of demonstrable iconographic significance, says the CODART release.

This is all pretty exciting stuff.

But the findings also also beg an obvious question: why were the overpaints done in the first place, if the paint beneath is in such good nick? Who in their right mind would paint over the van Eycks’ brushwork if there was no real cause to do so? From what I gather—and I am by no means especially knowledgable about this—the overpaints are OLD; they certainly have, or had, craqueleur consistent with 15th- or 16th-century paint, and they had, after all, gone undetected by the great connoisseurs of the 20th century (Panofsky, Friedländer and so on never, as far as I know, doubted very much that what they were looking at was the original paintwork–there is a great irony here that much of the scholarship on the altarpiece has been obsessed with discerning Jan’s hand from Hubert’s, whereas it seems, on the outside shutters at least, that up to now we’ve been looking at neither!). When I first heard about the overpaint (again, via Christina Currie), I’d presumed they had been done to conceal fire damage, inflicted on the work in the 16th century–a plausible story, I’d thought. But that can’t be the case, since the paint underneath is superior to the overpaints and well preserved. So it’s all a bit strange. I daresay answers will be forthcoming when the restorations are complete in 2017 and the panels are reunited—less the Just Judges, unless by some miracle it turns up just in time—inside St. Bavo’s, doubtless to great fanfare and accompanied by myriad publications! Watch this space…

 

Jamie

Why I like this module…Art, Architecture and Design in Fin-de-Siecle Vienna

Interested in studying at the University of Birmingham? This is what Guinevere has to say about her second-year module…also, don’t forget to scroll down to see more ‘Why I like this module…’ posts.

Guinevere Wood, second year BA, History of Art and Italian

Guinevere Wood, second year BA, History of Art and Italian

Art, Architecture and Design in Fin-de-Siecle Vienna has been the most enjoyable and stimulating module I have studied thus far at university. I chose this unusual subject to contrast with my Renaissance modules in both Italian and Art History. It offers an overview of the city’s flowering of culture that occurred between 1890 and 1910, whilst contextualising such social and cultural changes in this period. Camilla Smith is an engaging lecturer and we have explored how the city of Vienna was redesigned and found out how diverse Secessionist styles were. As a result, I am now organising a Vienna trip with fellow classmates to further pursue our interests!

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This second year module:

• is taught by Dr Camilla Smith, a specialist in the visual cultures of England, Switzerland and the Weimar Republic

• focuses on Secessionist artists such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Koloman Moser, exploring their work in relation to a series of social, cultural, psychological and literary issues

• provides a deep understanding of ‘modern’ Vienna with regards to the changing conditions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at beginning of the twentieth century

• investigates the impact of design projects by Adolf Loss, Otto Wagner and the Wiener Werkstätte with particular reference to the notion of Gesamtkunstwerk

• incorporates extracts and discussions on film, music and theatre

 

If you want to get a real feel for studying History of Art with us come along to our History of Art Taster Day on 20th September – find out more here and check back for the full programme soon!

 

Chicago Archives: Imogen reports on a research trip to the US

A view of Chicago from the Willis Tower, 1,353 feet up

A view of Chicago from the Willis Tower, 1,353 feet up

An aspect of PhD research that I especially enjoy is tracking down and analysing archival material. I’ve recently returned from a five-week research trip to the US (generously funded by an AHRC grant) where I visited 9 different archives that hold documentation relating to the art therapy courses that Bauhaus artist and teacher László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) developed at the Institute of Design in Chicago in 1943. In 1933 the Nazis closed the Bauhaus school of art in Germany, and Moholy-Nagy, like many of the institution’s teachers and students, emigrated to the US where he continued to practise and develop Bauhaus concepts and methods.

To find out more about both Moholy-Nagy’s interest in the possibilities of art therapy and the medical professionals with whom he worked, I spent most of my time in Chicago (Birmingham’s twin city), where I visited archives at the Art Institute of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis and the Chicago History Museum. I also flew to New York to pursue my lines of enquiry further, spending my mornings at the Archives of American Art and afternoons at The Museum of Modern Art archives. (I would need another blog post entirely to explain why researching at MoMA was so particularly exciting…) The following week, I hotfooted it over on an Amtrak train to Springfield, the capital of Illinois, to view documentation from the slightly bizarrely titled ‘Department of Mental Hygiene’ from the 1940s.

MoMA sculpture garden

MoMA sculpture garden

Archives are rich and exciting sources of information. Unpublished letters, reports, minutes, manuscripts, and diaries, as well as exhibition catalogues, advertisements and newspaper articles all communicate vital empirical information about how people or institutions operated together, and subsequently pave the way for further investigation into what particular art practices might mean. Archival research leads to exciting moments of discovery when you stumble across an illuminating reference. There were moments during my trip, usually towards the end of the day when, tired and hungry, I was jolted sharply from the haze of fatigue by a reference leaping out from a file. On one occasion, this was an unpublished typescript written by Moholy-Nagy, held within the personal papers of a Chicago-based occupational therapist, which contributes to my understanding of how, and with whom the artist operated within the therapeutic field. These small instances of revelation amount collectively to a greater understanding of a subject.

Of course, there are also pitfalls to archival research. Archives raise questions about the possibilities of over-interpretation. How far can you draw conclusions by analysing the language used in letters, which might have been written in haste, for example? Importantly, Michel Foucault argues that archives are a source of power in society and that their storage is never a passive act. Primary source documentation shapes how history is written, and, in light of this, omissions and silences in material can be as significant as what is recorded…

Anish Kapoor's Cloud Gate (the artist's first public outdoor work installed in the US)

Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate (the artist’s first public outdoor work installed in the US)

 

'The Bean' at night

‘The Bean’ at night

During my time in the US, I was also fortunate to meet up with archivists, curators and research fellows, which led to thought-provoking discussions about my PhD research and allowed me to consider further the position of my own work within current scholarship.

Alongside my research in the archives, I also had the opportunity to explore the exciting and culturally-rich city of Chicago, experiencing Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate, views from the 1,353 foot high Willis Tower ledge, a free open-air Tchaikovsky concert at Millennium Park and fireworks at Navy Pier. Not to mention the incredible collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, outdoor public artworks by Picasso, Miro, Chagall and Dubuffet, Hull-House Museum, the underground Art Deco vaults at the Chicago Board of Traders (normally closed to the public), a river-boat architecture tour, the renowned antique Randolph Street Market, the grand stairs at Union Station from The Untouchables, Chicago’s famous deep-dish pizza, and drinks on the 96th floor of the Hancock Center…

 

Picasso's untitled sculpture at Daley Plaza

Picasso’s untitled sculpture at Daley Plaza

Top of the John Hancock Center

Top of the John Hancock Center

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877 at the incredible Art Institute of Chicago

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, at the Art Institute of Chicago

Post-archive ice cream...

Post-archive ice cream…

Why I like this module…Digital Culture

History of Art student, Hannah, tells us why Digital Culture is an exciting MOMD offered at UoB – an MOMD is a Module outside the Main Discipline that can be taken alongside your main degree programme, allowing you to explore a different discipline during your undergraduate studies…

Hannah Welfare, 1st year BA, History of Art

Hannah Welfare, 1st year BA, History of Art

Digital Culture is taught in a very different style to other modules I have taken. We are taught in a very ‘hands-on’ style and explore images and programmes using large touch tables. In particular I am learning how to research history and culture through the use of digital technology, such as Google Earth. Through this I feel that I have learnt how I can use digital technology to present my research in both a visual and innovative way. I am also learning about the limits of digital technology in the fields of history and culture. The module is giving me a great insight into how the opportunities of the new digital age can develop my historical research, and so I am glad that I’m taking this module as my MOMD.

In the 21st century, digital technologies are ubiquitous and so an understanding of their applicability and value within the Arts and Humanities and beyond is of fundamental importance for both academic study and employability. Using case studies from various cultural collections, this course introduces students to a range of digital technologies in a practical, hands-on way, whilst relating their use to diverse research cultures. It includes the analysis of current and future trends in digital technologies, such as massive and open data, multi-touch and multi-user interfaces, and the 3D internet.digital

This first year MOMD:

  • is assessed by the creation of a multimedia output and an oral presentation,
  • allows students to relate their studies directly to their own degree disciplines,
  • is taught across the disciplines leading to fascinating cross-disciplinary debate.

 

To find out more about the Digital Humanities Hub click here.

Cultural Internships 2014-15: an opportunity not to be missed!

Are you a UoB graduate looking to gain experience in the cultural sector? Then look no further, applications are now open for this year’s Cultural Intern Scheme, so get yours in now!

Successful applicants will be given the opportunity to work in one of the region’s fantastic cultural institutions, with the added support and training offered by the University of Birmingham’s Cultural Engagement team. 6-month paid internships are available at:

BBC BirminghamBirmingham Museums Trust, Birmingham Opera Company, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO), Flatpack Film Festival, Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, Performances Birmingham (Town Hall/Symphony Hall), Sampad, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

For more information on how to apply go to the Cultural Internship webpage, the deadline for applications is 21st July 201UoB crest4.

Having benefited from being a Cultural Intern, I can thoroughly recommend applying for this fantastic scheme, if you would like to read about my experience at Birmingham Museums Trust, see my post here. Read about some of the other interns’ experiences on the UoB Culture blog.

Good luck to this year’s applicants!

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Why I like this module…Women and Artistic Culture in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Period

Joint Honours student, Holly, tells us why she enjoyed this final year module…

Holly Wain, finalist, BA French and History of Art

Holly Wain, finalist, BA French and History of Art

Women and artistic culture is a very interesting and well-formulated module. It has given me a new perspective on medieval art and culture as it draws upon the recent growth of scholarship on women as active subjects of the period. In lectures and seminars we are encouraged to look at art critically and I have been able to see images in a new light. Instead of rewriting past historians’ views we are able to develop our own, through carefully chosen reading lists that enable us to apply contemporary writing on gender to the medieval period.

The module has also helped with my dissertation as it has given me a more in depth understanding of the medieval period and it has tied in with a module in the French side of my degree on contemporary female fiction. I have enjoyed the module as it is not limited to one type of art or one methodology.

Read Holly’s post on her research project on a manuscript in Liège here.

madonna and childThis final year special subject:

•is taught by Dr Elizabeth L’Estrange, a specialist in art and manuscripts of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries

•explores works of art in relation to ideas about sexuality and gender in the medieval and early modern period

•Focuses on the different social, political, and religious roles played by women and how this shaped their art patronage

•Examines works produced or commissioned by women such as Sofonisba Anguissola, Isabella d’Este, Margaret of Austria, and Elizabeth I

 

More posts to follow from the undergraduates, so watch this space!

Why I like this module… Inside the Gallery: Histories, Theories, and Practices of Museums and Galleries

If you’re heading into Year 12 or 13, now is the season of Open Days and all things Uni-related. As part of that season, we’ll be showcasing a few of our modules here on The Golovine to give you a sense of what they involve and what our students make of them. First up, Romy and Sophie give us their views on the second year module, Inside the Gallery: Histories, Theories, and Practices of Museums and Galleries.

Inside the Gallery’ was one of the most interesting modules that I took in my second year. The module looks at the role of museums and galleries and the practicalities of exhibiting art works. Over the course we visited various museums across Birmingham and had talks by individuals working within fields such as curating and restoration. The assessment of the module requires the group to create their own hypothetical exhibition, using the knowledge gained to plan out an exhibition in its entirety, from loan requests and installation procedures to budgeting and marketing the show.

Romy, Second Year, BA History of Art

Romy, Second Year, BA History of Art

I really enjoyed the active basis of the course that required me to think about art differently. As I am very interested in the possibilities of working with art, meeting those people who have incredibly exciting roles has given me insight into where I may take my future career.”

 

This second year module:
•draws on the expertise of our own gallery, the Barber Institute
•explores other collections in and around Birmingham
•offers an insight into museums’ curating, marketing, education and finance departments
•is assessed by a virtual exhibition

 

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I recently had a great opportunity to put the skills I learnt from taking ‘Inside the Gallery’ into practice when I worked with South African artist Cathy Layzellto develop and organise an exhibition of her work. After securing the venue, the exhibition had to be marketed, the artwork organised for display and priced. The exhibition was a huge success, with Cathy selling much of her work and it was an enjoyable day for all.

Sophie, finalist, JH History of Art and History

Sophie, finalist, JH History of Art and History

I am so grateful that I had the opportunity to take this course, which just shows the range of topics available to students of Art History at the University of Birmingham. Not only is there great diversity in the type of art that we study, but we also learn how to apply our knowledge in the modern day art world.”

 

To find out more about Inside the Gallery and other courses on offer, click here.

If you want to get a real feel for studying History of Art with us amongst the fantastic collections of the Barber Institute, come along to our History of Art Taster Day on 20th September – find out more here and check back for the full programme soon!

Professor Lisa Jardine and Excavating Early Modern Women’s History, 18th June

Professor Lisa Jardine

in conversation with IAS Distinguished Visiting Fellow Dr Nadine Akkerman

Challenges for Early Modern Women’s History

 Wednesday 18th June 2014

 Barber Institute of Fine Arts 4.30- 5.30pm

 Jardine

 

The University of Birmingham

Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS)

Archival research has dramatically altered women’s studies. It has confirmed the fact that early modern women writers published not chiefly in print, but mostly in manuscript. Since the 1980s English literary scholars have discovered hundreds of manuscripts penned by female authors in widely-dispersed libraries and repositories. Anthologies and digital projects such as PERDITA have made access to these texts easier for researchers and students alike. But while in this way more female authors (letter-writers, poets and playwrights) have been able to capture our attention, the political dealings of Englishwomen, even those of the highest status, have continued to be neglected. Apart from the correspondence of Elizabeth I, for instance, none of the letters of royal Englishwomen, whether queens-consort or regnant, have been collected or edited. Nor have these textual traces been scrutinised for evidence of the writers’ real historical importance. Jardine and Akkerman will offer exciting new research opportunities for excavating early modern women’s history.

There will be opportunities for questions and a reception.

Lisa Jardine CBE is Professor of Renaissance Studies at University College, London, where she is Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Humanities and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters.

 

The event is free but booking is essential.

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