Category Archives: University of Birmingham

Mortar boards, pins, heels, wine, prizes and speeches: it’s Graduation 2014!

It’s that time of year again when campus is buzzing with excited (and slightly nervous) students, proud parents, and lecturers dressed as you’ve never seen them before! Graduation is a time to celebrate all our History of Art students have achieved during their time at Birmingham, not just on their degree programme but also as members of our department, the Barber Institute, UoB and the city itself. As a department we are pleased to be able to give out two prizes each year – the Sam Beighton Prize for the best dissertation, and the Emily Rastall Prize for the best overall contribution to the department. Competition is always stiff and there are more worthy candidates than there are prizes: every year, many of our students give generously of their time and energy in volunteering for various events, helping to run open days, applicant visit days, and workshops, and offering peer support. The department really appreciates this because it helps to make the department what it is – friendly, fun, and a great place to study.

Here we’ve put together a selection of photos from the ceremony on July 11th when Single and some Joint Honours History of Art Students graduated. You can read about about our prize winners and also see David, one of the department’s founding members, being given the by-now traditional ‘lift off’!

Dr Richard Clay with Tayler, Alice and Olivia at our pre-gown reception

Dr Richard Clay with Tayler, Alice and Olivia at our pre-gown reception

 

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Senior lecturer David Hemsoll and Dr Fran Berry at speech time

 

Students and parents at speech time

Students and parents at speech time

 

This year, the Emily Rastall prize, awarded in memory of a student who sadly passed away just after her finals in 2012, was shared by French and History of Art student Holly Wain and History of Art student Caroline Hetherington for their overall contribution to the department.

On receiving the prize, Caroline said: ‘Receiving the Emily Rastall prize was a little surprising (and embarrassing!), but I was very pleased to get it. Being recognised for contributing to the department made me think back over the three years of my course and remember the exciting things I was able to accomplish. It definitely reminded me that there was a lot more to my degree than the final mark.’

How did she feel at graduation? ‘Graduation was a lovely opportunity for all of us to be excited and proud after all the nerves of results day, although for me the best part of the day was my parents turning up about two minutes before we went on stage to receive our degrees.’

Is there anything she’ll miss now she’s graduated? ‘I will miss actually studying art history the most, as especially in final year I have loved the amount of research and interesting conversations that have taught me so much more about the subject. Alongside this, writing a dissertation about a previously unstudied sculpture probably gave me the most satisfaction.’ But, Caroline’s not going very far: ‘I am not leaving the University yet – I’m now a graduate trainee in Professional Services, working on different placements over the next year. I don’t know where I’ll go after that, but I’m pretty sure I’m not done studying yet.’

 

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Holly (left) and Caroline standing by the tree planted in Emily’s memory in the Barber grounds

 

Holly said, ‘I feel very honoured to be receiving the Emily Rastall Prize as it means the department can continue to celebrate the commitment and enthusiasm Emily had for Art History at the Barber. It also gave me the chance to reflect on my past four years in the History of Art department and how much I enjoyed contributing to projects like the Golovine Blog.’

How was graduation for her? ‘My graduation day was fantastic because I could share all the relief and happiness with my family and friends. My favourite moment was walking out of the Great Hall after the ceremony and feeling proud and excited for the future!’

What is her favourite memory of her degree? ‘My best memory of studying art history at the Barber is working with my tutor Liz for my dissertation. I loved researching using primary sources in archives because I felt like I could genuinely contribute something new and different. I enjoyed it so much that I am coming back to the Barber in September to do a research masters in History of Art.’

 

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Cheers! Drs Fran Berry and Camilla Smith on the Barber steps with Caroline, Tayler, olivia, Alice and Nelle

 

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It all happened here! Holly, Hang, Emma and Caroline with Dr Liz L’Estrange on the Barber steps

 

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Relieved that no-one fell up or down the stairs! Claire, Louisa, Connie and Grace after the ceremony

 

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Milling around outside the Barber

 

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Hats off!

 

And now for the most traditional event of the day…

 

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Ready…

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…steady…

 

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…wave, David!

 

And now for something more sensible (well, depends what you make of the lecturers’ outfits):

Outside the Barber Institute of Fine Arts

Outside the Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Sam Beighton Prize for the best dissertation was this year awarded to Joint Honours History of Art and English student, Sarah Cowie. Here she tells us a bit how she felt receiving the prize about the  dissertation that she wrote.

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Prize-winner Sarah on graduation day

 

How did she feel getting the prize? ‘I am very pleased to have been awarded the Sam Beighton Prize this year, as I know there was much competition! It is a nice recognition of my efforts with the dissertation, and I am extremely grateful to my supervisor for guiding me in the right direction.’

How was graduation? ‘My graduation day was lovely, although as a Joint Honours student I graduated on a different day to some of my  History of Art peers, but Josh and I did still manage to have a photo shoot in front of the Barber though!’

What was her best memory of studying at Birmingham? ‘Aside from the second-year study trip to Rome, I think my best memories are of the Barber. It is such an inspiring environment, with amazing research materials in the library and galleries, and always a great venue for lunch with concert music playing in the background!’

Any plans for the future? ‘My plans for the future are yet to be made – I wasn’t very good at thinking ahead in final year! At the moment I’m considering doing a law conversion in Bristol, after travelling this year.’

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Sarah with fellow JH History of Art and English student Josh

 

What was it like researching and writing a dissertation? ‘In the same way as with any research, my dissertation topic adapted, evolved (and unfortunately considering the word count, expanded!) the more I read around the field of study. What began as an interest in Kurt Schwitters’ association with the German Dadaists gradually became a study of exile and anti-nationalism during the Nazi regime; a subject area that complimented my final year special subject, German Modernisms of the Body.

The dissertation explores national identity and the concept of Heimat in Kurt Schwitters’ (1887-1948) assemblage, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, which was produced in Hanover in 1920 and then reworked by the exiled artist nineteen years later in Oslo. The dramatically different cultural climates of these two completion dates – which bridge together post-World War One Germany and pre-World War Two Europe – have invited interpretations of the work that place special emphasis on Schwitters’ increasingly diminished sense of German national identity under the Nazi Regime. However, considering the irreparable damage left following Germany’s defeat in 1918 and the anti-nationalist sentiments outlined in the artist’s essay ‘Nationalitätsgefühl’ (National Sentiment) from 1924, the current study questions the extent to which Schwitters had a fixed sense of national identity, or any kind of investment in the Volksgemeinschaft even during these earlier years.

 

Kurt Schwitters, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, 1920/1939. Oil, paper, cardboard, wood, fabric, and ceramic on board (97 x 69 x 11 cm) London, Tate Collection.

Kurt Schwitters, Picture of Spatial Growths/Picture with Two Small Dogs, 1920/1939. Oil, paper, cardboard, wood, fabric, and ceramic on board (97 x 69 x 11 cm) London, Tate Collection.

 

In challenging the reading of Spatial Growths as evidence of German or Norwegian national identity, the central tenet of the dissertation explores how Schwitters’ sustained use of found materials (themselves fragments of a disordered reality) is symbolic of a wider process of ordering exile. Indeed, the concept of Merz – a label which encompasses Schwitters’ innovative creative practices and a name which he adopted for himself in the 1920s – sheds light on the artist’s understanding of a transnational Heimat; signalling Schwitters’ desire for a more flexible identity in the midst of political discourses on national purity. Approached thus, the fusion of two nationalities in Spatial Growths cannot be considered a visual enactment of the artist’s loss of German national identity. Rather, through its palimpsest qualities and the incorporation of domestic materials, it alludes to Schwitters’ prolonged search for a stable Heimat in an unstable existence; contributing to a narrative of homelessness that defined the life of this artist.  

Detail of Schwitters' Spatial Growth

Detail of Schwitters’ Spatial Growth

 

Despite moments of panic when I thought I might not be able to actually view the work (it was touring Germany for much of the year), writing the dissertation came to be as rewarding as it was challenging. The opportunity to study one work of art in such depth, whilst drawing on the expertise of my supervisor, Dr Camilla Smith, enabled me to form a research topic that interested me greatly, and that I felt had not been fully explored before.’

 

Well done again to all our graduates this year – you have done us proud! You can see interviews with some of our students on graduation day here.

 

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Why I like this module…Art, Architecture and Design in Fin-de-Siecle Vienna

Interested in studying at the University of Birmingham? This is what Guinevere has to say about her second-year module…also, don’t forget to scroll down to see more ‘Why I like this module…’ posts.

Guinevere Wood, second year BA, History of Art and Italian

Guinevere Wood, second year BA, History of Art and Italian

Art, Architecture and Design in Fin-de-Siecle Vienna has been the most enjoyable and stimulating module I have studied thus far at university. I chose this unusual subject to contrast with my Renaissance modules in both Italian and Art History. It offers an overview of the city’s flowering of culture that occurred between 1890 and 1910, whilst contextualising such social and cultural changes in this period. Camilla Smith is an engaging lecturer and we have explored how the city of Vienna was redesigned and found out how diverse Secessionist styles were. As a result, I am now organising a Vienna trip with fellow classmates to further pursue our interests!

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This second year module:

• is taught by Dr Camilla Smith, a specialist in the visual cultures of England, Switzerland and the Weimar Republic

• focuses on Secessionist artists such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Koloman Moser, exploring their work in relation to a series of social, cultural, psychological and literary issues

• provides a deep understanding of ‘modern’ Vienna with regards to the changing conditions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at beginning of the twentieth century

• investigates the impact of design projects by Adolf Loss, Otto Wagner and the Wiener Werkstätte with particular reference to the notion of Gesamtkunstwerk

• incorporates extracts and discussions on film, music and theatre

 

If you want to get a real feel for studying History of Art with us come along to our History of Art Taster Day on 20th September – find out more here and check back for the full programme soon!

 

Why I like this module…Digital Culture

History of Art student, Hannah, tells us why Digital Culture is an exciting MOMD offered at UoB – an MOMD is a Module outside the Main Discipline that can be taken alongside your main degree programme, allowing you to explore a different discipline during your undergraduate studies…

Hannah Welfare, 1st year BA, History of Art

Hannah Welfare, 1st year BA, History of Art

Digital Culture is taught in a very different style to other modules I have taken. We are taught in a very ‘hands-on’ style and explore images and programmes using large touch tables. In particular I am learning how to research history and culture through the use of digital technology, such as Google Earth. Through this I feel that I have learnt how I can use digital technology to present my research in both a visual and innovative way. I am also learning about the limits of digital technology in the fields of history and culture. The module is giving me a great insight into how the opportunities of the new digital age can develop my historical research, and so I am glad that I’m taking this module as my MOMD.

In the 21st century, digital technologies are ubiquitous and so an understanding of their applicability and value within the Arts and Humanities and beyond is of fundamental importance for both academic study and employability. Using case studies from various cultural collections, this course introduces students to a range of digital technologies in a practical, hands-on way, whilst relating their use to diverse research cultures. It includes the analysis of current and future trends in digital technologies, such as massive and open data, multi-touch and multi-user interfaces, and the 3D internet.digital

This first year MOMD:

  • is assessed by the creation of a multimedia output and an oral presentation,
  • allows students to relate their studies directly to their own degree disciplines,
  • is taught across the disciplines leading to fascinating cross-disciplinary debate.

 

To find out more about the Digital Humanities Hub click here.

Cultural Internships 2014-15: an opportunity not to be missed!

Are you a UoB graduate looking to gain experience in the cultural sector? Then look no further, applications are now open for this year’s Cultural Intern Scheme, so get yours in now!

Successful applicants will be given the opportunity to work in one of the region’s fantastic cultural institutions, with the added support and training offered by the University of Birmingham’s Cultural Engagement team. 6-month paid internships are available at:

BBC BirminghamBirmingham Museums Trust, Birmingham Opera Company, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO), Flatpack Film Festival, Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, Performances Birmingham (Town Hall/Symphony Hall), Sampad, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

For more information on how to apply go to the Cultural Internship webpage, the deadline for applications is 21st July 201UoB crest4.

Having benefited from being a Cultural Intern, I can thoroughly recommend applying for this fantastic scheme, if you would like to read about my experience at Birmingham Museums Trust, see my post here. Read about some of the other interns’ experiences on the UoB Culture blog.

Good luck to this year’s applicants!

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Professor Lisa Jardine and Excavating Early Modern Women’s History, 18th June

Professor Lisa Jardine

in conversation with IAS Distinguished Visiting Fellow Dr Nadine Akkerman

Challenges for Early Modern Women’s History

 Wednesday 18th June 2014

 Barber Institute of Fine Arts 4.30- 5.30pm

 Jardine

 

The University of Birmingham

Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS)

Archival research has dramatically altered women’s studies. It has confirmed the fact that early modern women writers published not chiefly in print, but mostly in manuscript. Since the 1980s English literary scholars have discovered hundreds of manuscripts penned by female authors in widely-dispersed libraries and repositories. Anthologies and digital projects such as PERDITA have made access to these texts easier for researchers and students alike. But while in this way more female authors (letter-writers, poets and playwrights) have been able to capture our attention, the political dealings of Englishwomen, even those of the highest status, have continued to be neglected. Apart from the correspondence of Elizabeth I, for instance, none of the letters of royal Englishwomen, whether queens-consort or regnant, have been collected or edited. Nor have these textual traces been scrutinised for evidence of the writers’ real historical importance. Jardine and Akkerman will offer exciting new research opportunities for excavating early modern women’s history.

There will be opportunities for questions and a reception.

Lisa Jardine CBE is Professor of Renaissance Studies at University College, London, where she is Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Humanities and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters.

 

The event is free but booking is essential.

A Year on from Brum…2013 graduate Sapna Patel tells us about her internships and new job!

A year ago, life seemed so different: I remember this time last year I was stressing (like every other final year student) about our upcoming exams that were to take place in 3 days’ time. As well as cramming every quote, date, and title I could possibly fit into my brain about Visual Representations of the Body, 16th Century Venice, and Interiors and Interiority, there was also the worry about what I would be doing work-wise after exams were finished and university was officially over. I’m pretty sure I wasn’t the only graduate panicking over this, and after attempting to secure an internship during my final year, I finally decided to let go and just focus on my exams which were only going to happen once. However that worry about what I was going to do career-wise just wouldn’t go away and luckily, whilst on a quick revision break on Facebook (typical!) I saw a post on our History of Art page about an opportunity to work at Sotheby’s Institute of Art. After reading up on the role, I realised the deadline wasn’t till the end of May so I made a mental note to go back to this once my exams were done.

With exams finally over, and after having too much fun at Refreshers, I went back to the application. I wasn’t really expecting to hear back or get through to an interview but surprisingly received an email whilst on holiday asking if I could attend an interview that week. I returned from my holiday early and went along feeling very hopeful and so was ecstatic when I was offered an internship with the Careers Department. My first day was the next week!

I commuted from Birmingham initially until I moved back home and started the long trek of a commute from Lincolnshire. Besides the 5.30am starts, and the returns at 8.30pm, my three months in the summer were extremely glamorous and I thoroughly loved working for a company that trusted me to get involved in as much as possible! Working in the beautiful surroundings of Bloomsbury, I was always on the go, going to different places or working with different departments. My line manager, Christina, was very supportive and encouraging to work with and from my first day I was already placing orders for all sorts for upcoming corporate art events without her permission! My first day also involved going to Somerset House to plan last minute things for a talk that was occurring that very evening.

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Entrance to Sotheby’s Institute of Art, Bedford Square, London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then soon found out that I would be representing Sotheby’s Institute at Masterpiece London 2013, a prestigious luxury arts fair set in the South Grounds of the Royal Hospital in Chelsea. Working for Masterpiece was certainly eventful. Running around London, I always had my hands full, from curating our stand, to networking with galleries and art dealers at the fair, and teaching and inspiring young school children about art and antiques, something that certainly tested my patience!

The Masterpiece Banner!

The Masterpiece Banner!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Networking with other galleries was my favourite aspect of working for Masterpiece. I loved seeing galleries dealing with the works of arts that I had specialised in during university and discovering new contemporary pieces that were unfamiliar to me. Having studied Books of Hours and illuminated manuscripts during my second year, I was delighted to see Les Enluminures at Masterpiece who displayed an array of manuscripts and miniatures from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. I was fortunate enough to handle a Book of Hours and was astonished at its excellent condition: the pigments and quality of the illuminated designs were still in such a good state.

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Manuscripts…

Sapna MSS

…and more manuscripts!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working as a Careers Intern, I assisted with graduate recruitment on a global basis, specialising in the arts and business market, a field of work I did not know much about initially. I was amazed to discover the numerous career paths a History of Art graduate could pursue from working in established galleries, and reputable auction houses, to working on a freelance basis and even working with finance and wealth management with a focus on art. It’s great to know all this is possible with a degree in History of Art – it just goes to show, as long you show your passion and dedication for a certain career, anything really is possible. Most recruiters will look at the skills you’ve acquired during your degree such as analysing texts and being able to put together a coherent argument through your essays. They’re also interested in initiative and innovative methods of researching that you employ for long pieces of work such as your dissertation.

I certainly learned a lot during my three-month internship, from being able to sit in the library reading and developing my knowledge about the History of Art, to attending networking events with employees from the major three auction houses (Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Bonham’s), and working with our office based in New York. I also learnt about parts of the world that are only just emerging in the contemporary art scene such as India (a country close to my own heart, ethnicity, religion and culture). I was really pleased to be able to network with Neha Jaiswal, a contemporary Indian art curator whose work combines traditional Indian art with a contemporary twist. And of course there were the gorgeous summery walks from Kings Cross Station and the buttery croissants I consumed every morning…! Through this placement, I was able to begin my dream of working in London and I can definitely say this internship gave me the right start I needed in building my career.

My daily walk to work...

My daily walk to work…

I was in fact offered the opportunity to extend my internship for another three months at Sotheby’s but I was fortunate enough to gain a six-week position as a Gallery Invigilator and Exhibition Assistant at Richard Nagy Ltd on Old Bond Street. This job really appealed to me as the works Richard deals with in his private gallery cover those areas of art I had specialised in at university, especially on Camilla’s second year module on Fin-de-Siècle Vienna. I owe so much to Camilla’s fantastic course and being able to draw on everything I learnt from the module in my interview with Richard and his fellow Gallery Director, Nina. Working in Mayfair was another great experience: walking through the Burlington Arcade every day and past all the big labels is every girl’s dream! The gallery itself is small and intimate and specialises in the works of Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. The gallery also handles German Expressionism: Die Bruecke, and in particular Die Neue Sachlichkeit, as well as more recent British artists of a related sensibility like Spencer, Bacon and Freud. In addition, Symbolist artists such as Redon, Ensor and Kubin, are also frequently available. The gallery also handles many artists in the modernist canon. The gallery hosts an annual exhibition, such as the 2013 one on Georg Grosz entitled ‘George Grosz. Berlin. Prostitutes, Politicians, Profiteers’ I was very excited to be working with works of art that I’d learnt and studied closely at university.

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Georg Grosz, Illustrious Society (1927)

Grosz Inflation

Georg Grosz, Inflation (1928)

Grosz Barracks

Georg Grosz, In Front of the Barracks (1918)

My role at Richard Nagy Ltd was highly varied so as well as working on the gallery floor as an Invigilator, I was also involved with working in the gallery’s office updating and maintaining the company’s client database, handling client money, archiving works and preparing sales reports for any paintings that were to be exhibited and sold at upcoming art fairs. Whilst working at the gallery, I was fortunate enough to participate in the  PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square during London Art Week where the gallery had its own stand selling an array of its paintings. I was able to work at PAD both independently and with the directors in organising client appointments for those interested in making a sale.

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Drawing by Egon Schiele exhibited at PAD

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Drawing by Gustav Klimt exhibited at PAD

Lastly, I was responsible for selling exhibition catalogues in order to raise as much money possible for a charity the company strongly support, Global Witness, and was able to raise £7,070. I was genuinely sad to be leaving this post but am pleased to say I still keep in touch with the gallery and would highly recommend people visit it. The gallery has rare drawings and paintings by numerous artists and I found it really interesting to see their works in this setting.

PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square

PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square

Since leaving Richard Nagy Ltd, I have been busy working as a freelance artist and am excited to be appearing in a local art event and hopefully will be able to sell some of my own works! I am also currently training for Race for Life and will be running the 10K which I am both terrified and excited about!

I’m ending this blog post with a bit of a twist since I have just secured myself a place on a graduate scheme ago working in a field very different to the those I have just described. I am excited to be starting my post at Corporate Executive Board as a Graduate Associate working in Key Strategic Accounts. History of Art really does open up many doors! In fact, my interviewers both studied History and Modern History at university so I feel really reassured about starting this post even though I didn’t do a numerical degree. I look forward to building and shaping my career within CEB in Finance and Accounts, where my role will focus on working with internal stakeholders across the globe, working with the company’s grand client portfolio, including large pharmaceutical companies, and finalising contracts with them. Indeed it is the complete opposite to what most History of Art graduates are thought to pursue but it goes to show that the skills we learnt during our studies mean it really is possible to go into numerous areas with this valuable degree. For students who are unsure of what career field to go into, I’d advise you to look into all sorts of options and see what works out for you. I’d recommend applying for internships to help build your work experience and CV and not to be afraid of pursuing your instincts or changing tack: believe you can excel and any career opportunities out there are yours!

 

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Curating Art History Colloquium – Programme

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There’s still time to buy tickets for this year’s Departmental Colloquium. Tickets can be purchased from the online shop. Students from the Department of Art History, Film and Visual Studies can confirm their attendance by emailing Faith Trend directly at: FCT357@bham.ac.uk.

The programme has now been finalised and is available below. With a truly international billing–our keynote is coming all the way from Australia–, besides speakers from closer to home, the colloquium promises to be a fascinating exploration into the worlds of museum curating and academic art history, and we hope to see lots of you there!

 

Curating Art History: Dialogues between museum professionals and academics

7th and 8th May 2014

 The Barber Institute of Fine Art, The University of Birmingham 

 

PROGRAMME

 

DAY 1 (7th May)

14:00 – 14:45 Registration and refreshments (Barber Institute Foyer)

14:45 – 15:00 Welcome and Introduction (Barber Lecture Theatre)

Erin Shakespeare (UoB); Nicola Kalinsky (The Barber Institute)

 

PANEL 1: ETHNOGRAPHY AND CURATING NATIVE ART (Barber Lecture Theatre)

Respondent: Nicola Kalinsky

15:00 – 15:50 KEYNOTE: The Hang and Art History

Catherine De Lorenzo (University of New South Wales, Australia)

15:50 – 16:10 Contemporary Native Perspectives: Dialogue and Exchange in Artistic Practices and Curatorial Methodologies

Helen Shaw (University of York)

16:10 – 16:30 t.b.c.

Bryony Onciul (University of Exeter)

16:30 – 17:00 Response and Questions

 

19:00 – 21:00 Conference dinner (venue to be confirmed)

 

DAY 2 (8th May)

9:30 – 10:00 Registration (second day attendees) (Barber Institute Foyer)

 

PANEL 2: KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT (Barber Lecture Theatre)

Respondent: Clare Mullet (UoB)

10:00 – 10:20 Art detective: creating collection knowledge through public engagement

Andy Ellis (Public Catalogue Foundation)

10:20 – 10:40 Cross-talking in Engage Journal 

Karen Raney (University of East London)

10:40 – 11:00 Response and Questions

 

11:00 – 11:30 Coffee break (Barber Institute Foyer)

 

PANEL 3: EXHIBITIONS THAT CHALLENGE CURATORIAL PRACTICE AND ART HISTORY (Barber Lecture Theatre)

Respondent: Richard Woodfield (Journal of Art Historiography; UoB)

11:30 – 11:50 Post-humanist Desire: Visualising Cyborgs and the Hybridised Body

Ming Turner (National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan)

11:50 – 12:10 [Re]Exhibiting Impermanent Art

Vera Carmo (University of Maia, ISMAI, Portugal)

12:10 – 12:30 Between a Rock Drill and a Hard Place: Researching and Curating Sir Jacob Epstein (1880-1959)

Elin Morgan (UoB; The New Art Gallery Walsall)

12:30 – 13:00 Response and Questions

 

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch (Barber Institute Foyer)

Time to look at the Faith and Fortune exhibition in preparation for the afternoon’s paper (Coin Gallery, Barber Institute)

 

14:30 – 15:00 Exhibiting coins as economic artefacts: Faith and Fortune: visualising the divine on Byzantine and early Islamic coinage (Barber Lecture Theatre)

Chairs: Jamie Edwards and Faith Trend (UoB)

Rebecca Darley (The Warburg Institute) and Daniel Reynolds (UoB)

 

15:00 – 16:00 Roundtable AHRC Iconoclasms Network (Barber Lecture Theatre)

A cross-disciplinary debate and Art Under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm at Tate Britain

Chair: Lauren Dudley (UoB)

Richard Clay, Henry Chapman, Leslie Brubaker (UoB); Stacy Boldrick (The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh); Simon Cane (Birmingham Museums Trust)

16:00 Closing Remarks

Jutta Vinzent (UoB)

 

16:30 – 17:30 Drinks reception (Barber Institute Foyer)

 

The Department of Art History, Film and Visual Studies Annual Colloquium: Curating Art History

UoB crest

Tickets are now on sale for this year’s Annual Art History Colloquium, organised in conjunction with the Journal of Art HistoriographyTickets, priced at £10 for students and £20 full price, can be purchased from the Online Shop here.

“Curating Art History: Dialogues between museum professionals and academics” will take place on the 7th and 8th May 2014 at The Barber Institute of Fine Arts.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Catherine De Lorenzo

(University of New South Wales, Australia)

AND:

Helen Shaw (University of York); Andy Ellis (Public Catalogue Foundation); Karen Raney (Engage Journal); Ming Turner (National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan; Vera Carmo (University of Coimbra, Portugal); Elin Morgan (The University of Birmingham; The New Art Gallery, Walsall); Rebecca Darley and Daniel Reynolds (The Warburg Institute; The University of Birmingham); Richard Clay, Henry Chapman, Leslie Brubaker (The University of Birmingham); Stacy Boldrick (The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh); Simon Cane (Birmingham Museums Trust)

THEMES:

Ethnography and curating native art:
Australian art history and Aboriginal art; curating Native American art

Knowledge exchange and development:
Providing specialist knowledge to public art collections; gallery education and curatorial strategies

Exhibitions that challenge curatorial practice and art history: 
Post-humanist desire: Innovative research and methods of display; Crash Music: re-exhibiting impermanent art; Jacob Epstein’s Rock Drill: a creative curatorial opportunity

Case study at the Barber Institute:
Exhibiting coins as economic artefacts: Faith and Fortune: visualizing the divine on Byzantine and early Islamic coinage

Round table - International Iconoclasms network:
Cross-disciplinary debate and Art Under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm at Tate Britain

The poster is available here: Curating Art History Colloquium 7th and 8th May 2014

Undergraduate Research Scholarships 2014

Every year, the College of Arts and Law funds a number of Undergraduate Research Scholarships that give non-final year students the opportunity to work with a member of staff one of their research projects. This year, three UGRS are available to students in the School of Languages, Culture, Art History and Music in the fields of drama and theatre, centenary exhibitions, and women at the court of Renaissance France.

Each scholar will undertake full-time research supervised by a member of academic staff for a period of five weeks between 23rd June and 26th September 2014.  An allowance of £230 per week will be paid to the scholar for each of the five weeks.

This is a really exciting opportunity to do paid work that will also enhance your academic career, help hone your research skills, and let you see what academics get up to when they are not teaching! Previous scholars have reported that the scheme helped to:

  • refine interpersonal and research skills
  • develop their understanding of academic research
  • boost their confidence
  • identify where their personal strengths lie
  • influence thoughts on what to do after graduation
  • enhance their CV

As part of this year’s scheme, one of our lecturers, Elizabeth L’Estrange, has been awarded a scholarship for her research on Anne de Graville at the French Court: Her Library, her Religion and her Works

Anne de Graville (1490-after 1540) was a noble woman who became lady-in-waiting to Queen Claude of France in the early sixteenth century. Anne built up an impressive library, of which some forty manuscripts – many of them illuminated – are still extant. She also reworked two popular literary works for the Queen: her Rondeaux is a reworking of Alain Chartier’s Belle dame sans mercy (1420), and her Beau roman (see picture below) is a reworking of Boccaccio’s Teseida (c. 1360). Both texts engage with contemporary literary trends and, in particular, with an on-going debate about the nature of women and love (la querelle des femmes). In addition, like some of her noble contemporaries including the king’s sister Marguerite de Navarre and Henry VIII’s future wife, Anne Boleyn, Anne de Graville was a supporter of early evangelical religious reform. Anne’s contribution to French literary, religious and artistic culture has, however, never been studied in any detail. Elizabeth is planning to write a book that looks at Anne de Graville’s role in courtly culture by looking in particular at the books that she owned and the way that she represented herself.

Anne de Graville presenting her book to Queen Claude of France

Anne de Graville presenting her book to Queen Claude of France

The student employed on this project would carry out research into the courtly context of which Anne was a part and into her literary and religious interests. In particular they would be asked to:

  • Find out more about the books that formed part of her library and how this relates to her own writings as well as to contemporary literary interests
  • Carry out bibliographic searches of primary and secondary material to explore the culture of the French court and the people in Anne’s circle
  • Look for further evidence of Anne’s religious convictions
  • Look for and analyse further representations of Anne

This project would give the student, especially one with some knowlege of French, experience of working on a truly interdisciplinary project, offering them the chance to use and develop skills in the disciplines of history, art history, literary and religious studies. In addition, it will introduce the student to the way that researchers approach and interpret women in early modern culture. The project would thus open up a potentially new area for the student to explore, specifically enriching their knowledge of early modern women and of France in the early sixteenth century.

For more details on Elizabeth’s project, you can email her: e.a.lestrange@bham.ac.uk and download this file: E L’Estrange

You can also read about Holly Wain’s experience of working on a project with Liz in 2012 here.

Details of the other projects are here: Joanne Sayner  and Adam Ledger

And an application form is here: Application Form (LCAHM)

For more details on the scholarship scheme, please go to http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/university/colleges/artslaw/student-experience/opportunities/urs/index.aspx.

If you have any general questions about the scholarship scheme please contact Rachel Canty (r.canty@bham.ac.uk).

Completed application forms need to be returned to Rachel Canty in Room 203, Arts Building by 12 noon on Friday 4th April 2014.

 

Old Masters Work Experience at Christie’s, with a bursary from UoB, by finalist Olivia Weightman

Between the 2nd and 13th of September 2013 I was lucky enough to be offered a place to do two weeks’ work experience a Christie’s in London in their Old Master’s department. When I arrived on the first day I was given an introductory tour of the main areas of the building along with the 15 or so other people who were starting work that day as well. We were shown the main auction rooms and galleries at the front of house and then were taken to look at the warehouses and photography rooms at the back. This whistle stop tour of the most important areas of the building was quite overwhelming and left me with the thought that I would be spending half my time there just trying to find my way around.

Christie's in King Street, London

Christie’s in King Street, London

Once in the Old Master’s office it did not take me long to get a sense of the international scale that Christie’s works on. Each of the four specialists in the vicinity of my desk was talking to clients and other offices in a variety of different languages: most of them were able to speak more than two languages fluently and confidently. Each day I was assigned tasks by the graduate interns who had received them from the rest of the department, which meant every task was different. The work I mainly undertook revolved around administrative tasks, for example helping out with expense reports, and researching paintings for clients. The latter can often take a long time: while I was there we had to go through one particular client’s collection and help find the provenance of each piece. In fact, it took us two weeks and five people to go through this entire collection mainly because most of the time all we had to go on were photographs of the collection and very often we didn’t even have the title or artist of the paintings. In this situation we had to take the photograph to one of the specialists who would make an informed guess concerning the artist and then we would go to the Old Master’s library and look through every book they had on that particular artist to try and find any images that had compositional or stylistic similarities.

Working with a relative lack of information meant it could be a very long process that occasionally turned up no positive results. For example one particular piece was an oil sketch of a man’s head tilted upwards which the client believed was a sketch from a copy of a painting by Rubens…this meant we had to go through all of Ruben’s work trying to find a figure with a similar head and at times felt like a history of art version of where’s Wally!  On a few occasions we found ourselves needing a distraction from the books so we would visit the archives to look through sale records for the specialists, although this did mean navigating our way through the  warren like corridors and going up and down the 119 stairs (another work experience girl and I counted) between the office and archives.

Me in the Old Master’s library doing research for a private collection.

Me in the Old Master’s library doing research for a private collection.

Apart from doing research and administrative tasks I was lucky enough to gain some hands on experience during the ‘hilling’ process. This involved examining works that had just been sent in, prior to a sale, to record any signatures, marks and damage on the front and any writing and stamps on the back as this was essential for helping prove the provenance and authenticity of the painting.

During the second week of my placement the department was busy with setting up the auction of the collection of Professor Sir Albert Richardson, P.R.A, a celebrated collector, architect and President of the Royal Academy (1954-1956). The Old Master’s department was only involved in part of the auction as the 650 lots were made up of examples of Old Master and British paintings, British watercolours and architectural drawings, English and European furniture, sculpture and objects, garden statuary, books, clocks, musical instruments and Georgian costume. I was involved with the research of the Old Master’s pieces and I also helped out with writing up the labels for each piece. However, the most enjoyable part of helping out with the sale was the installation. There was very little time for the actual installation and with so many lots, the six rooms they were placed in were incredibly busy in the build up to the previews. But we did manage to get everything up, whilst also triple checking everything was straight and labelled correctly and in the end the entire collection looked fantastic together and the sale total was over 4 million. The sale was a nice, yet manic, end to two weeks of hard work, research and countless stairs which really gave me an insight into the inner workings of an international auction house and gave me a quick education into the Old Master’s art market today.

One of the gallery assistants admiring the collection of Professor Sir Albert Richardson

One of the gallery assistants admiring the collection of Professor Sir Albert Richardson

I would like to acknowledge the help that the University of Birmingham gave me in securing this great opportunity. I was only able to do the work experience placement after I was awarded a ‘UK Professional’ bursary by the University. This bursary is designed for people doing work experience during the summer holidays and covers the cost of any travel or living arrangements that are essential to you being able to take part in your placement. I would thoroughly recommend this bursary to anyone planning on undertaking a work experience placement during the summer as you can be granted between £100 and £800 to pay for essentials – for me, the bursary paid for my weekly train ticket and London travel card. You can find out more about the bursary – and other opportunities – on the Careers Network pages.

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