Tag Archives: internships

Cultural Internships 2014-15: an opportunity not to be missed!

Are you a UoB graduate looking to gain experience in the cultural sector? Then look no further, applications are now open for this year’s Cultural Intern Scheme, so get yours in now!

Successful applicants will be given the opportunity to work in one of the region’s fantastic cultural institutions, with the added support and training offered by the University of Birmingham’s Cultural Engagement team. 6-month paid internships are available at:

BBC BirminghamBirmingham Museums Trust, Birmingham Opera Company, Birmingham Repertory Theatre, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO), Flatpack Film Festival, Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, Performances Birmingham (Town Hall/Symphony Hall), Sampad, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

For more information on how to apply go to the Cultural Internship webpage, the deadline for applications is 21st July 201UoB crest4.

Having benefited from being a Cultural Intern, I can thoroughly recommend applying for this fantastic scheme, if you would like to read about my experience at Birmingham Museums Trust, see my post here. Read about some of the other interns’ experiences on the UoB Culture blog.

Good luck to this year’s applicants!

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Calling all HoA Graduates…Barber internships are now available!

Barber logo

MUSEUM INTERNSHIPS 2014/15

The Barber Institute is offering six museum internships over the coming year. The internships are designed to provide work experience for graduates with a degree in History of Art or a related subject, who are seeking a career in museums and galleries. Internships last twenty weeks and start in either September 2014 or February 2015. Interns work 21.5 hours per week and will be paid at a rate of £7.53 per hour.

To get an idea of what an internship can involve, read Sophie Rycroft’s post about her time working as a Collections in term.

 

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

 

1)        Collections Internships

 We are offering two internships working with our Collections team. Interns will gain experience in all aspects of curatorial work, including research, documentation and the planning, organisation and installation of exhibitions. They will also be given the opportunity to curate a small display of prints and drawings and to give gallery talks.

2)        Learning and Access Internships

 We are offering two internships working with our Learning and Access team. Interns will gain experience in all aspects of the planning, organisation and delivery of learning activities, which encourage the study of art and enable our visitors to enjoy, understand and reflect upon the Barber’s unique collection of paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures and decorative arts.

 3)        Communications and Marketing Internships

 We are offering two internships working with our Communications and Marketing team. Interns will gain experience in all aspects of the planning, organisation and delivery of targeted marketing, social media, media relations, public relations and other communications campaigns aimed at encouraging different sectors of the community to visit the Barber and participate in its events and activities.

How to Apply

Applicants should be able to demonstrate a strong interest in, or knowledge of, History of Art, preferably supported by a formal academic qualification. In addition, they should have excellent communication and computing skills and a commitment to working in museums and galleries.

For further particulars and an application form, please visit the University of Birmingham’s website http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/jobs. The closing date for applications is Monday 9 June 2014. Interviews will be held in the week starting 23 June 2014.

The Barber Institute’s Internship Programme 2014/15 is sponsored by NADFAS (through the Patricia Fay Memorial Fund), the Chris Gait Endowment Fund and the Patrons of the Barber Institute.

 

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A Year on from Brum…2013 graduate Sapna Patel tells us about her internships and new job!

A year ago, life seemed so different: I remember this time last year I was stressing (like every other final year student) about our upcoming exams that were to take place in 3 days’ time. As well as cramming every quote, date, and title I could possibly fit into my brain about Visual Representations of the Body, 16th Century Venice, and Interiors and Interiority, there was also the worry about what I would be doing work-wise after exams were finished and university was officially over. I’m pretty sure I wasn’t the only graduate panicking over this, and after attempting to secure an internship during my final year, I finally decided to let go and just focus on my exams which were only going to happen once. However that worry about what I was going to do career-wise just wouldn’t go away and luckily, whilst on a quick revision break on Facebook (typical!) I saw a post on our History of Art page about an opportunity to work at Sotheby’s Institute of Art. After reading up on the role, I realised the deadline wasn’t till the end of May so I made a mental note to go back to this once my exams were done.

With exams finally over, and after having too much fun at Refreshers, I went back to the application. I wasn’t really expecting to hear back or get through to an interview but surprisingly received an email whilst on holiday asking if I could attend an interview that week. I returned from my holiday early and went along feeling very hopeful and so was ecstatic when I was offered an internship with the Careers Department. My first day was the next week!

I commuted from Birmingham initially until I moved back home and started the long trek of a commute from Lincolnshire. Besides the 5.30am starts, and the returns at 8.30pm, my three months in the summer were extremely glamorous and I thoroughly loved working for a company that trusted me to get involved in as much as possible! Working in the beautiful surroundings of Bloomsbury, I was always on the go, going to different places or working with different departments. My line manager, Christina, was very supportive and encouraging to work with and from my first day I was already placing orders for all sorts for upcoming corporate art events without her permission! My first day also involved going to Somerset House to plan last minute things for a talk that was occurring that very evening.

Sapna Sotheby's

Entrance to Sotheby’s Institute of Art, Bedford Square, London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then soon found out that I would be representing Sotheby’s Institute at Masterpiece London 2013, a prestigious luxury arts fair set in the South Grounds of the Royal Hospital in Chelsea. Working for Masterpiece was certainly eventful. Running around London, I always had my hands full, from curating our stand, to networking with galleries and art dealers at the fair, and teaching and inspiring young school children about art and antiques, something that certainly tested my patience!

The Masterpiece Banner!

The Masterpiece Banner!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Networking with other galleries was my favourite aspect of working for Masterpiece. I loved seeing galleries dealing with the works of arts that I had specialised in during university and discovering new contemporary pieces that were unfamiliar to me. Having studied Books of Hours and illuminated manuscripts during my second year, I was delighted to see Les Enluminures at Masterpiece who displayed an array of manuscripts and miniatures from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. I was fortunate enough to handle a Book of Hours and was astonished at its excellent condition: the pigments and quality of the illuminated designs were still in such a good state.

Sapna MSS 2

Manuscripts…

Sapna MSS

…and more manuscripts!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working as a Careers Intern, I assisted with graduate recruitment on a global basis, specialising in the arts and business market, a field of work I did not know much about initially. I was amazed to discover the numerous career paths a History of Art graduate could pursue from working in established galleries, and reputable auction houses, to working on a freelance basis and even working with finance and wealth management with a focus on art. It’s great to know all this is possible with a degree in History of Art – it just goes to show, as long you show your passion and dedication for a certain career, anything really is possible. Most recruiters will look at the skills you’ve acquired during your degree such as analysing texts and being able to put together a coherent argument through your essays. They’re also interested in initiative and innovative methods of researching that you employ for long pieces of work such as your dissertation.

I certainly learned a lot during my three-month internship, from being able to sit in the library reading and developing my knowledge about the History of Art, to attending networking events with employees from the major three auction houses (Sotheby’s, Christie’s and Bonham’s), and working with our office based in New York. I also learnt about parts of the world that are only just emerging in the contemporary art scene such as India (a country close to my own heart, ethnicity, religion and culture). I was really pleased to be able to network with Neha Jaiswal, a contemporary Indian art curator whose work combines traditional Indian art with a contemporary twist. And of course there were the gorgeous summery walks from Kings Cross Station and the buttery croissants I consumed every morning…! Through this placement, I was able to begin my dream of working in London and I can definitely say this internship gave me the right start I needed in building my career.

My daily walk to work...

My daily walk to work…

I was in fact offered the opportunity to extend my internship for another three months at Sotheby’s but I was fortunate enough to gain a six-week position as a Gallery Invigilator and Exhibition Assistant at Richard Nagy Ltd on Old Bond Street. This job really appealed to me as the works Richard deals with in his private gallery cover those areas of art I had specialised in at university, especially on Camilla’s second year module on Fin-de-Siècle Vienna. I owe so much to Camilla’s fantastic course and being able to draw on everything I learnt from the module in my interview with Richard and his fellow Gallery Director, Nina. Working in Mayfair was another great experience: walking through the Burlington Arcade every day and past all the big labels is every girl’s dream! The gallery itself is small and intimate and specialises in the works of Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. The gallery also handles German Expressionism: Die Bruecke, and in particular Die Neue Sachlichkeit, as well as more recent British artists of a related sensibility like Spencer, Bacon and Freud. In addition, Symbolist artists such as Redon, Ensor and Kubin, are also frequently available. The gallery also handles many artists in the modernist canon. The gallery hosts an annual exhibition, such as the 2013 one on Georg Grosz entitled ‘George Grosz. Berlin. Prostitutes, Politicians, Profiteers’ I was very excited to be working with works of art that I’d learnt and studied closely at university.

Grosz Illustrious

Georg Grosz, Illustrious Society (1927)

Grosz Inflation

Georg Grosz, Inflation (1928)

Grosz Barracks

Georg Grosz, In Front of the Barracks (1918)

My role at Richard Nagy Ltd was highly varied so as well as working on the gallery floor as an Invigilator, I was also involved with working in the gallery’s office updating and maintaining the company’s client database, handling client money, archiving works and preparing sales reports for any paintings that were to be exhibited and sold at upcoming art fairs. Whilst working at the gallery, I was fortunate enough to participate in the  PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square during London Art Week where the gallery had its own stand selling an array of its paintings. I was able to work at PAD both independently and with the directors in organising client appointments for those interested in making a sale.

Schiele 1

Drawing by Egon Schiele exhibited at PAD

Schiele 2

Drawing by Gustav Klimt exhibited at PAD

Lastly, I was responsible for selling exhibition catalogues in order to raise as much money possible for a charity the company strongly support, Global Witness, and was able to raise £7,070. I was genuinely sad to be leaving this post but am pleased to say I still keep in touch with the gallery and would highly recommend people visit it. The gallery has rare drawings and paintings by numerous artists and I found it really interesting to see their works in this setting.

PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square

PAD Art and Design Fair on Berkeley Square

Since leaving Richard Nagy Ltd, I have been busy working as a freelance artist and am excited to be appearing in a local art event and hopefully will be able to sell some of my own works! I am also currently training for Race for Life and will be running the 10K which I am both terrified and excited about!

I’m ending this blog post with a bit of a twist since I have just secured myself a place on a graduate scheme ago working in a field very different to the those I have just described. I am excited to be starting my post at Corporate Executive Board as a Graduate Associate working in Key Strategic Accounts. History of Art really does open up many doors! In fact, my interviewers both studied History and Modern History at university so I feel really reassured about starting this post even though I didn’t do a numerical degree. I look forward to building and shaping my career within CEB in Finance and Accounts, where my role will focus on working with internal stakeholders across the globe, working with the company’s grand client portfolio, including large pharmaceutical companies, and finalising contracts with them. Indeed it is the complete opposite to what most History of Art graduates are thought to pursue but it goes to show that the skills we learnt during our studies mean it really is possible to go into numerous areas with this valuable degree. For students who are unsure of what career field to go into, I’d advise you to look into all sorts of options and see what works out for you. I’d recommend applying for internships to help build your work experience and CV and not to be afraid of pursuing your instincts or changing tack: believe you can excel and any career opportunities out there are yours!

 

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Can I do it all over again, please? Stephanie O’Neill-Winbow reflects on her time as the Barber’s Learning and Access intern…

Four years ago, having moved from Muscat, Oman, to Birmingham to study History of Art, I was just a little bit lost. Like most students starting university, I was moving away from home to a place where I didn’t know anyone or where anything was; you suddenly have to become completely independent, make new friends, take care of yourself and try to cover up your ridiculously low alcohol tolerance, all the while working towards a degree so that, in three years’ time, you hopefully know a little bit more than you knew before! It’s fun, very fun! However, when your mind turns to work experience (so important for finding a job these days) it can often become clear that not everyone is in the same boat: some people have had gap years in which they gained experience or their parents know someone who knows someone who knows someone who can get them a job over the summer. I had nothing like this. In Oman you couldn’t work anywhere unless you had a work permit (generally not given to 17 year olds), my parents hadn’t lived in Europe for about thirty years, and I went to university straight out of High School. So I decided to gain my work experience right on my door step – at the Barber Institute.

Stephanie and colleagues beneath Lady Barber's portrait

Stephanie and colleagues beneath Lady Barber’s portrait

In the second term of my first year, after I had settled in a bit, I started to volunteer. I spent many mornings and afternoons at the welcome desk, greeting and providing information to the patrons; I also spent a couple of afternoons in the galleries, talking to people about the paintings, and asking the children to stop running around and not to throw themselves at the paintings. Then when the current volunteering scheme at the Barber was introduced, I began volunteering in the Learning and Access department. Immediately it became evident that this was what I preferred: I was working with children during workshops, helping out on tours, assisting at seasonal ‘fairs’ and generally setting up and cleaning up from activities. I volunteered so much that the members of the department knew me – I was even asked to pose (fully clothed and paid!) for a portrait sculpture class and to represent the Barber at Careers fairs. Although as a History of Art student I was spending a lot of time in the Barber, there is so much that I wouldn’t have known about it if I had only spent my time in its library or seminar rooms. There is so much going on in the Barber Institute besides it being the home of the University of Birmingham’s History of Art and Music departments. It was especially enlightening to learn about the different departments that make a working gallery successful: it’s not as simple as hanging some paintings on the wall and waiting for the visitors and money to roll in.

After two and half years of regular volunteering, I was coming to the end of my degree and becoming slightly concerned about what to do next. The opportunity to apply for a paid Learning and Access internship at the Barber came up and I knew that I wanted it! In fact, I had known about the internship during my degree and the thought of applying had been an added incentive to volunteer; thankfully it paid off! After I graduated in June 2012, I was offered the 5 month internship to start in February 2013. I was nervous starting here since it felt strange: for the previous three years I had gone to the Barber for lectures and seminars or to spend hours poring over books in the library. Suddenly it was completely different. I had a desk, a computer, and an office, and I was actually responsible for aspects of how of the gallery as a business was run, rather than a place to study! Initially the internship involved lot of admin, answering phone calls, making bookings and passing things onto members of the department who actually knew what was going on. However after about 2 months I felt completely at home. Alex with whom I mainly work has been unbelievably patient with me, answering every little question I come up with and giving me every opportunity to challenge myself and learn more. In fact all the staff behind the scenes at the Barber have been a delight to work with. From the security guards who help me move big furniture to set up for workshops, to the lovely ladies in HR who deal with the payroll, and the marketing and collections team (who also have interns) who are so easy and helpful to work alongside, it has been a real pleasure. Instead of ‘just’ an intern, I feel like a part of the team. It has also been incredible to be specifically trained to become part of a professional team. As I write this I have just under 4 weeks left of my internship, and the interviews for the next ‘lot’ of interns are taking place very shortly. I find that I’m passing the phone over less and less to somebody else, and if anything it’s actually very satisfying and enjoyable being a point of contact.

The About Face Family Guide that Stephanie helped put together

The About Face Family Guide that Stephanie helped put together

One of my tasks at the beginning of my internship was to put together the initial draft of the Family Guide for our new exhibition About Face: the guide is now finished and the exhibition is open and all has turned out very well! I’m responsible for the Learning Room, and the activities that are placed there for children when they visit the galleries. As I’ve grown into the role, I now help out a lot more with gallery visits and workshops, and my confidence had soared; I genuinely feel beneficial to the department and part of the team. Last week the Barber Institute’s staff were invited to the National Gallery’s private view for the opening of the exhibition Birth of a Collection: Masterpieces from the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Unbelievably, I was invited as well! And I must say, I didn’t think that at the start of my career I would be attending a private view at the National Gallery in the company of so many important and influential people in the art world. This internship has given me opportunities and experience that I genuinely was not expecting and for which I will be forever grateful.

Stephanie (third from left) and other Barber staff at the private view of Birth of a Collection at the National Gallery in London

Stephanie (third from left) and other Barber staff at the private view of Birth of a Collection at the National Gallery in London

It is rare to find an internship in a respected, impressive and successful gallery that is not only long enough to allow you to learn something new and to challenge yourself, but also where you’re part of a team in which you have real responsibility – and one which is paid!  My internship here has given me incredible experience that I know will hugely benefit me in the future. Working in the Learning and Access department has made me sure that I want to continue in this direction. I truly feel that I owe the Barber Institute so much: I not only studied for my degree here, but I gained so much relevant experience here through volunteering, all of which led to the most amazing opportunity of actually working here. I’m now looking into doing a MA in a relevant field once I finish here in June, but really, I’d quite like to be the intern all over again…!

Stephanie at the tea for departing interns

Stephanie at the tea for departing interns

Read about Sophie Rycroft’s experience as an intern in the curating department here. The next round of Barber interns will be recruited in May 2014.

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Alumnus Lucy Wheeler tells us about her post-university experience!

In this brief summary of my two years since graduation, I hope I can provide an overview of my experiences of working in museums and galleries to date.

After graduating from Art History and spending six months firstly teaching in Cambodia and then travelling in Asia, I returned to Birmingham to take up placements at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and at Research and Cultural Collections (RCC). This was a great way to gain experience working with 2 very different collections; the Barber, a range of sculptures, paintings and works on paper from Old Masters to Impressionists – and RCC – an idiosyncratic University collection ranging from physics objects, foetal models to impressive modern art by British artists Peter Lanyon, Barbara Hepworth and Eduardo Paolozzi. At the Barber I was fortunate enough to curate my own exhibition about leisure in Victorian Britain, presenting works on paper from the satirical paper Punch that had never been shown in the gallery before, examples that demonstrated a humorous side to collecting at the Barber. As well as gaining in depth knowledge of the print culture and social implications of sport in 19th century England, I learnt basic paper conservation techniques to spot when a piece of work needed a bit of t.l.c.

At RCC, my main role was to manage a heritage project about University House – the first all-girls hall of residence (the building is now part of the Business School). I got to curate and interpret a period room in the Business School, create a heritage leaflet and organise a reunion for the Alumni of University House. I also got to spend time exploring objects from the University Archive linked to University House such as a war log book and photographs from tennis parties in the 30’s. As well as teaching me the logistics of how to organise a large scale event, this project enthused my understanding of Heritage and the importance of preserving artefacts from the past. I was touched by the letters I received from University House Alumni full of memories of their time at the University and was fascinated by the stories the heritage objects in our collection motivated by participants at the event.

After completing my placements in Birmingham, I embarked for London to start an internship at the Wallace Collection in the education department. Working to coordinate and deliver a number of workshops for school, community and access groups, I saw how greater access to diverse and innovative education projects could benefit confidence and development and realised my commitment to working within programming in a gallery environment. I also learnt how a successful education department needed the anchor of strong administration and organisation and took time to get to grips with data entry, spread sheets and databases.

I then was lucky enough to get funding to study for an MA in Art History at University College London. I look back on my MA as an amazing experience – the rigorous programme introduced for me new ways of understanding and approaching Early Modern visual culture using contemporary theory and I gained a good knowledge of South African contemporary practice. I made some great friends on the course and also volunteered at UCL Art Museum where I gained experience of updating museum databases and digitalising the collection online. Whilst writing my MA dissertation in the summer I took a month out to work with the BBC interning in the arts documentary department, writing pitches and treatments for BBC Four art documentaries and running on location shoots for shows including Imagine and The Review Show.

After graduating from UCL I started working at Jerwood Visual Arts, a contemporary gallery in South London which is a key initiative of the Jerwood Charitable Foundation. Highlights from this role include installing the annual Jerwood Drawing Prize and working with Marcus Coates and Grizedale Arts for the exhibition ‘Now I Gotta Reason’. I learnt so much at JVA, from scheduling and delivering artist workshops, managing a team of volunteers and marketing exhibitions through social media platforms.

©Hydar Dewachi

©Hydar Dewachi

I am currently working on a Freelance basis, creating education workshops and lectures for schools and museums. If I could offer any words of advice from my experience so far for those wanting to pursue a career in a gallery it would be: gain experience as soon as possible – from a department and museum that appeals to you; be prepared to undertake small, repetitive tasks-mail outs and room set ups are just as important as bigger tasks; PERSEVERE– the arts are overcrowded with lots of people wanting to work in galleries-but be patient and an opening will come!

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