New not new art history: reconstructing the Church of S Pier Maggiore, Florence

JAMIE EDWARDS

Image: The National Gallery (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUXa1nDtOB0)

Image: The National Gallery (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUXa1nDtOB0)

A neat little film here–brought to my attention by a good friend!–by the National Gallery, documenting their efforts alongside Cambridge University to reconstruct the now mostly destroyed church of S Pier Maggiore in Florence, which once housed Francesco Botticini’s Assumption of the Virgin altarpiece (1475-6). The research was undertaken in preparation for the National’s current show: Visions of Paradise: Botticini’s Palmieri Altarpiece

Botticini, Assumption of the Virgin, 1475-6, National Gallery, London

Botticini, Assumption of the Virgin, 1475-6, National Gallery, London

The film gives a good glimpse into how architectural historians are able to make use of the latest technologies–in this case, photogrammetric imaging–in order to shed new light on works of art, this time by endeavouring to gain better insights about, in the National’s words: “long-perpetuated misunderstandings about [the altarpiece’s] authorship, date, original location, and iconography.”  It is, in other words, a good example of how new technologies can play a useful and important role in more “traditional” art historical enquiries. Regular readers might recall that this isn’t always the case–I’ve written several times before on this blog about how newfangled tech, and its manipulation (or misuse), can, sadly, lead to over-exuberant and highly-questionable conclusions about works of art (e.g. here and here).

In this case, the researchers have got it right. Using photogrammetric imaging the team have managed to gain a better understanding of the original fabric of S Pier Maggiore. This has then enabled them  to identify more precisely the original location for Botticini’s altarpiece and its relationship with other important works of art once displayed inside the church, namely Jacopo di Cione and workshop’s Coronation of the Virgin polyptych (the location of which on the high altar at the end of the main nave of San Pier Maggiore is now intersected by a road, appropriately named the Via di S Pier Maggiore):

Model showing the original nave of S Pier Maggiore and the location for Jacopo di Cione and workshop's Assumption of the Virgin, on what is now the Via S Pier Maggiore, Florence

Model showing the original nave of S Pier Maggiore and the location of Jacopo di Cione and workshop’s Assumption of the Virgin, on what is now the Via di S Pier Maggiore, Florence

Anyway, the brief video is below. And if it piques your interest in Botticini and his altarpiece, the National Gallery’s exhibition runs until March 28 next year.

 

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